Science Department
Integrated Physics & Chemistry
Grade Placement: 9-10 Credit: 1
This course is a study of the metric system, measurement, the nature and structure of matter, physical and chemical changes, forces, thermal energy, motion and machines, electricity and magnetism, waves, light, sound, elements and their properties, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, acids, bases, and salts.

Biology
Grade Placement: 9-10 Credit: 1
This is a lab science course that emphasizes the role of living things in the environment. Students will conduct field and laboratory investigations over a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses, growth and development of living organisms from cells to tissues to organs to organ systems, genetics, evolution, taxonomy, metabolism and energy transfer in living organisms, living systems, homeostasis, ecosystems and plants. Students gain understanding of how biology relates to everyday life.

Chemistry
Grade Placement: 10-11 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Biology, Algebra 1, and IPC or permission from Biology teacher to skip IPC.
This course is the study of structure, composition, and behavior of matter. Emphasis is placed on practical principles and concepts of general chemistry, and the quantitative aspects of chemical reactions are stressed. Topics include the nature of matter, physical states of matter and the composition of matter. This class is for college preparation in chemistry (like a Pre-AP class), so there is more calculation involved than Conceptual Chemistry and goes beyond the scope of the STAAR test to prepare students for the rigor of college chemistry.

Chemistry AP
Grade Placement: 11-12 Credit: 1
Recommended Prerequisite: 90 or above in regular science and math courses. Completion of Biology and Chemistry
This course covers the atomic and periodic nature of matter, the physical status of matter, quantities and qualitative aspects of chemical reactions, chemical bonds, acids and bases, equilibrium, electrochemistry and organic chemistry. There is an emphasis on problem solving, and quantitative determinations related to chemical reactions. Preparation for the AP exam and more depth in concepts requires more outside class study time than in previous classes (about 30 minutes per day every day, or about 3 hours per week.)

Advanced Physics
Grade Placement: 11-12 Credit: 1
Recommended Prerequisite: Alg 2 and at least 2 lab science credits
Co-requisite : Pre-Calculus (or have already taken)
This course addresses the fundamental interactions between matter and energy, including mechanics, properties of matter, heat, sound and light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. Being in (or have already taken) Pre-Calculus is recommended since vectors are used in calculations (sine, cosine and tangent). The first semester concentrates on laws of motion (Newton’s 3 laws and velocity, acceleration, distance relationships). The second semester concentrates on sound, light and electricity.

Biology Honors
Grade Placement: 12 Credit: 1
Recommended Prerequisite: 85 or above on previous Pre-AP math and science courses, or a 90 or above in regular math and science courses; credits in biology and chemistry; passed 11TH TAKS.
This course is an in-depth survey in general biology. Emphasis is on cell biology genetics, botany,
zoology, microbiology, and vertebrate anatomy and physiology. A research project is required each semester. The objective of the course is to give students enough background to be able to
pass the College Board Exam in Biology that could result in college credit.

Anatomy & Physiology Honors
Grade Placement: 11 & 12 Credits: 1
Introduction to basic biological principles as applied to the human. Detailed studies of the human body plan, terminology and the integumentary, nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive and muscular systems.

Geology Dual Credit – FPC
Grade Placement: 11 & 12 Credits: 1
Principals of physical and historical geology. Study of the earth’s composition, structure, and internal and external processes. Includes the geologic history, deformation, mass movement, weathering, types of rocks, and the minerals that make up the rocks.

Environmental Science
Grade Placement: 10-12 Credits 1
Students will learn the major ecological concepts and the environmental problems that affect the world in which they live. The course will also introduce students to technological developments that have created environmental problems as well as technology that is being used to help solve the problems.

Advanced Plant and Soil Science
Grade Placement: 11-12 Credit: 1
Note: May be used as 4th year of science credit if taken after Chemistry & Physics
Physics is not required on the Foundation Graduation Program.
May be taken for dual credit (high school & college) or for high school credit only.
(1) Plant and Soil Science provides a way of learning about the natural world. Students should know how plant and soil science has influenced a vast body of knowledge, that there are still applications to be discovered, and that plant and soil science is the basis for many other fields of science.
(2) Investigations, laboratory practices, and field exercises are to be used to develop an understanding of current plant and soil science.
(3) This course is designed to prepare students for careers in the food and fiber industry. Students will learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge in a scientific setting.

Advanced Animal Science
Grade Placement: 11-12 Credit: 1
Note: May be used as 4th year of science credit if taken after Chemistry & Physics
Physics is not required on the Foundation Graduation Program.
May be taken for dual credit (high school & college) or for high school credit only.
1) Advanced Animal Science. To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry standards. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course examines the interrelatedness of human, scientific, and technological dimensions of livestock production. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through field and laboratory experiences. 2) Nature of science. Science, as defined by the National Academy of Sciences, is the "use of evidence to construct testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena, as well as the knowledge generated through this process." This vast body of changing and increasing knowledge is described by physical, mathematical, and conceptual models. Students should know that some questions are outside the realm of science because they deal with phenomena that are not scientifically testable.
2) Nature of science. Science, as defined by the National Academy of Sciences, is the "use of evidence to construct testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena, as well as the knowledge generated through this process." This vast body of changing and increasing knowledge is described by physical, mathematical, and conceptual models. Students hsould know that some questions are outside the realm of science because they deal with phenomena that are not scientifically testable.
3) Scientific inquiry. Scientific inquiry is the planned and deliberate investigation of the natural world. Scientific methods of investigation are experimental, descriptive, or comparative. The method chosen should be appropriate to the question begin asked.
4) Science and social ethics. Scientific decision making is a way of answering questions about the natural world. Students should be able to distinguish between scientific decision-making methods (scientific methods) and ethical and social decisions that involve science (the application of scientific information).
5) Science, systems, and models. A system is a collection of cycles, structures, and processes that interact. All systems have basic properties that can be described in space, time, energy, and matter. Change and constancy occur in systems as patterns and can be observed, measured, and modeled. These patterns help to make predictions that can be scientifically tested. Students should analyze a system in terms of its components and how these components relate to each other, to the whole, and to the external environment.